What is the Tunnel Wall?

.........................A timely collection of conservative articles about liberal influences on politics and culture in America ......................



Saturday, January 28, 2017

International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27th

Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Day  "Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Day (Yom Hashoah in Hebrew) is a national day of commemoration in Israel, on which the six million Jews murdered in the Holocaust are memorialized. It is a solemn day, beginning at sunset on the 27th of the month of Nisan and ending the following evening, according to the traditional Jewish custom of marking a day. More...

Internet results on the Shoah: the Holocaust  First page only linked here.

Yad Vashem


Frieda Levinson lived in Riga with her husband Zelik, their nine-year-old son Zalman, Frieda's mother Sara Lohak and other relatives. Her sister, Agnes Hirschberg, immigrated to Eretz Israel (Mandatory Palestine) in 1936, but remained in contact with her family in Riga.  Zalman also sent his aunt letters and drawings.  In April 1941, Frieda sent Agnes a short postcard from Riga.  This was the last sign of life from Agnes's family. The names of her family members appear on the lists of inmates in the Riga ghetto.  After the war, Agnes was informed that her mother Sara, her sister Frieda, her nephew Zalman and her brother-in-law Zelik had been murdered.  Her brother, Misha Lohak, survived.

. . . Most of the Jews of Europe were dead by 1945. A civilization that had flourished for almost 2,000 years was no more. The survivors – one from a town, two from a host – dazed, emaciated, bereaved beyond measure, gathered the remnants of their vitality and the remaining sparks of their humanity, and rebuilt. They never meted out justice to their tormentors – for what justice could ever be achieved after such a crime? Rather, they turned to rebuilding: new families forever under the shadow of those absent; new life stories, forever warped by the wounds; new communities, forever haunted by the loss. . .

The Righteous  (Non-Jews who risked all to save Jews from the Nazis.)  "Attitudes towards the Jews during the Holocaust mostly ranged from indifference to hostility. The mainstream watched as their former neighbors were rounded up and killed; some collaborated with the perpetrators; many benefited from the expropriation of the Jews property.

"In a world of total moral collapse there was a small minority who mustered extraordinary courage to uphold human values. These were the Righteous Among the Nations. They stand in stark contrast to the mainstream of indifference and hostility that prevailed during the Holocaust. Contrary to the general trend, these rescuers regarded the Jews as fellow human beings who came within the bounds of their universe of obligation.

Oskar Schindler  "Oskar Schindler was a German industrialist, former member of the Nazi Party and possibly the most famous "Righteous Gentile" who is credited with saving as many as 1,200 Jews during the Holocaust. His story was brought to international acclaim by the 1982 novel Schindler's Ark and the 1993 film, Schindler's List." . . .

"Not long after acquiring his “Emalia” factory - which produced enamel goods and munitions to supply the German front - the removal of Jews to death camps began in earnest. Schindler's Jewish accountant put him in touch with the few Jews with any remaining wealth. They invested in his factory, and in return they would be able to work there and perhaps be spared. He was persuaded to hire more Jewish workers, designating their skills as “essential,” paying off the Nazis so they would allow them to stay in Krakow. Schindler was making money, but everyone in his factory was fed, no-one was beaten, no-one was killed. It became an oasis of humanity in a desert of moral torpor." . . .
When the war ended, Schindler fled to Argentina with his wife and a handful of his workers and bought a farm. In 1958, he abandoned his land, his wife and his mistress to return to Germany. He spent the remaining years of his life dividing his time between Germany and Israel, where he was honored and taken care of by his “Schindlerjuden.”

Music of the Holocaust  "The songs that were created during the Holocaust in ghettos, camps, and partisan groups tell the stories of individuals, groups and communities in the Holocaust period and were a source of unity and comfort, and later, of documentation and remembrance." . . .
"The collection also includes two songs written after the Holocaust by Kaczerginski that portray the mood and ideology of the survivors. All the songs are presented here in the original Yiddish." . . .



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